kayryn

racethewind10:

gaga-lovato:

WAIT……I just had a thought. Regina should have died. That was the point no one could survive this…however it was her using magic and Emma passing through the magic barrier…..true love has the power to transcend realms yadda yadda yadda….does it not just look like in this gif Regina has realized something?
Am I the only one who has had this random thought…should I stop drinking the kool-aid lol

please never stop drinking the kool-aid

racethewind10
At the end of the day, this is really expensive fan fiction.

Edward Kitsis

source: [EW]

(via misslizanne)

I’ve read fanfiction by 14 year olds with more narrative consistency and character continuity. Calling Ouat fanfiction is an insult to fanfiction…

although at least there’s no mpreg…

(via racethewind10)

Disney needs to get a better handle on what a fandom can produce before it spends money on attempting to engage with fans, then, because it’s like the writer with the least talent that begs for reviews on ff.net just got given an unlimited budget, and has the nerve to insist that their interpretation MUST be Canon.

IF IT’S ALL FANFIC, THEN NOTHING IS CANON.

(via webgeekist)

linguisticsyall
whosaprettypolyglot:

maskedlinguist:

lindentreeisle:

acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.

LINGUISTIC BITCHSLAP.

Thank you. I was too lazy to find my post.

Fun related fact - the meaning of the word “November” in several Slavic languages (and “October” in Croatian because fuck you that’s why) - variations on listopad - is also named for falling leaves, list being “leaf” and pad being “fall”.

whosaprettypolyglot:

maskedlinguist:

lindentreeisle:

acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.

LINGUISTIC BITCHSLAP.

Thank you. I was too lazy to find my post.

Fun related fact - the meaning of the word “November” in several Slavic languages (and “October” in Croatian because fuck you that’s why) - variations on listopad - is also named for falling leaves, list being “leaf” and pad being “fall”.